Plato and aristotles ideal city

Passages in Aristotle are cited as follows:

Plato and aristotles ideal city

In this write-up, we intend to evaluate the points of agreement and disagreement as regards the prescriptions on the ideal state by both these Socratic philosophers.

Plato and aristotles ideal city

Hence, an ideal state must be a state that is based on a perfected standard. Plato and Aristotle both prescribed what these perfected standards on which the state be based, should be, according to their metaphysical orientation about man.

For both, the end of the state is ethical; as justice is the basis for the ideal state. For Plato, the individual and the state are one, as they both have a tripartite nature of which justice is the result of a sound balance of these three parts.

Aristotle asserts that the city-state polis comes into being for the sake of life, but exists for the sake of the good life. Critics of Democracy — Both perceived democracy as the worst form of government. For Plato, democracy is the worst of all lawful best governments and the best of all lawless worst ones.

A national concern — Plato prescribed that everyone must be given an equal opportunity in order to prove their mettle as regards where they belong in the social stratification. This is why he established the academy. For Aristotle, there should be laws guiding education as a national concern.

For each is a part of the state and the care bestowed on each part, naturally tends towards the care of the whole. Slavery and stratification of citizens -Both considered slaves as properties of their masters and justified the fact that some people are by nature slaves. The fact that both philosophers hail from aristocratic wealthy families could be the reason for this.

Ethics, Part One: What Justice Is

Size of the ideal state - Both prescribed that the ideal state be small in size, in order to attain perfection easier. The Greek state Athens was relatively small. Also, it happened that the whole of Greece was divided into small city states, of which each had their own autonomous government and ruling system.

Private property Plato prescribed in his communism concerning the abolishment of private property, especially to the guardians and the auxiliaries. Plato says anything property that must be owned by them, must be owned collectively. This could be as a reason of their societal hierarchy and the tendency to abuse such privilege.

Aristotle on the other hand criticized the abolition of private property, as he recognizes the need to own such even though the private possession of goods must be within certain limits. He therefore preached against the excessive accumulation of goods and advised citizens to use their limited possessions for the benefit of the common good.

Aristotle asserts that the women are normally subordinate to men, for the male is by nature superior and the female inferior.In the third book of Aristotle’s Politics, he sets forth his ideal government. In order to find the best one, he informs the reader that he will exposit and reject several theories by other prominent philosophers.

Plato and aristotles ideal city

He begins, naturally, with Plato’s ideal city. Aristotle (b. – d. BCE), was a Greek philosopher, logician, and scientist. Along with his teacher Plato, Aristotle is generally regarded as one of the most influential ancient thinkers in a number of philosophical fields, including political theory.

Introduction: The Question and the Strategy

The ideal city of the Laws, which Plato probably wrote shortly after the Statesman, accords a greater political role for unwise citizens than the Republic does (see Plato: on utopia). 6. Conclusions about the Ethics and Politics of Plato’s Republic.

The Republic is a sprawling work with dazzling details and an enormously wide-ranging. PLATO-ARISTOTLE IDEAL STATE: COMPARE AND CONTRAST COMPARING PLATO AND ARISTOTLE’S IDEAL STATE i. it happened that the whole of Greece was divided into small city states, of which each had their own autonomous government and ruling system.

CONTRASTING PLATO AND ARISTOTLE’S IDEAL STATE i. Private property. (When used to refer to forms as Plato conceived them, the term “Form” is conventionally capitalized, as are the names of individual Platonic Forms.

The term is lowercased when used to refer to forms as Aristotle conceived them.) For Plato, the Forms are perfect exemplars, or ideal types, of the properties and kinds that are found in the world.

The word “ideal” simply means a “perfected standard”. Hence, an ideal state must be a state that is based on a perfected standard. Plato and Aristotle both prescribed what these perfected standards on which the state be based, should be, according to their metaphysical orientation about man.

Plato and Aristotle's Ideal City